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Explain Design for Assembly. How is it different from Design for manufacturing

saurabhjain

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Explain Design for Assembly. How it is different from Design for manufacturing

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Design for assembly: The whole design is done on the basis of how the assembly of all the parts will take place.

Its different from design of manufacture,
because DOM the basic criteria is how the manufacturing process will be done on parts.
which machine available, which can be easy to manufacture in the workshop with the tools and machines available,....

saurabhjain likes this

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I think, Design for Assembly requires the application of Meteorology after the Manufacturing of parts to be assembled...

Plz correct me if I m wrong...

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Think of Design for Assembly as prototyping. You make a design that works, that can be built in a shop.

Design for manufacturing involves shifting part placements, part types, etc. so as to make sure it can be easily manufactured, repeatably and cheaply, with many part placements done in a simple manufacturing style.

Take an engine for example. A prototype (design for assembly) may require machining by machinists, and assembly by the engineers/machinists. Fasteners, connectors, etc wherever it makes sense in the design.

But for design for manufacturing, you'd design it such that as many fasteners as possible are on the same side at the same angle, so they can be easily placed all at once by a machine. Something that can't happen if they are all over the place. So you are taking into consideration how the piece will be manufactured on a large scale instead of just how to make the design work.

saurabhjain and jitengalaxy like this

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Design for manufacturing, we need to prepare:

-Technical description

-Choose of materials for each parts

-Calculation of strength or necessary other calculus for each parts

-List of standard elements such as bolts and washers

-Choose of machine for each parts

-Calculation of necessary time for each parts

-Requirements for examination for each parts and assembly

Design for manufacturing, we need prepare:

-Technical description

-Choose of materials for each parts

-Calculation of strength or necessary other calculus for each parts

-List of standard elements such as bolts and washers

-Choose of machine for each parts

-Calculation of necessary time for each parts

-Requirements for examination for each parts and assembly

-Instruction for installation and maintenance

-List of applied standards and regulations for the design

Design for assembly, we need to prepare:

-Technical description-Method statements

-Time Schedule for assembly

-Necessary manpower for assembly

-Necessary tools for assembly

-Specification of testing the entire assembly

-Risk assessment

This is my opinion for the general case. I apologize for the excessive descriptions, maybe ?

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hellow sir..

i am new in ME.

its a nice question.

i think during desing for assembly the designer may only think for easiness of assembling the parts, like, how much tolerance require and which fit will be used, how type of threads should provide for quick assembly and all the things related to assembling any assembly. during designing he should think that what ever is easy to assemble is can be manufactured.

and in during design for manufacturing the designer have to think for easiness for manufacturing. and consult with assembly people that this design will solve their problem or not.. actually both the designer have to work in coordination or i think only one designer can work for both the design.

Mahesh Sadawarte likes this

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Design for assembly shows the finished parts with exact dimensions ready to assemble .

while the design for manufacturing the dimensions are different from the assembly dimensions taking into account machining .

Sharafat Hussain likes this

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DFM:

financial success of any organisation is depends on the how much profit margin earned by selling each parts, if the cost of manufacturing is low with producing good quality product, automatically profit is more.

and this is the aim of the DFM.

to achive this goal DFM (development team) reduce the cost of

1. cost of components

2.cost of assembly

3.cost of overhead

and DFA is the sub set of the DFM. uses some guidelines to keep the assembly cost as low as possible.

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the basic difference is that in design for assembly the engineer does not need to specify the dimensions for the parts but just to specify where each part is to be placed or assembled, But in design for manufacturing the engineer must provide dimensions and extra info for each and every single part and how is that part to be manufactured by which machine etc...hope the answer for the question..

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“to manufacture” refers to the manufacturing of the individual component parts of a product or assembly and “to assemble” refers to the addition or joining of parts to form the completed product. Hence, the term “design for manufacture” (or DFM) means the design for ease of manufacture of the collection parts that form the product after assembly and “design for assembly” (or DFA) means the design of the products for the ease of assembly."

Excerpt taken from “Product Design for Manufacture & Assembly” Boothroyd Dewhurst Knight ISBN 978-1420089271 – a reference book by specifically Professors Geoffrey Boothroyd and Peter Dewhurst whom are widely attributed with being the inventors of DFA / DFM / DFMA theories, methodology and software – visit www.dfma.com

In my experience of over 25 years of conducting product design, DFA and DFM analyses, DFA is about the design of a physical product for optimal economy and simplicity: it is the design of a product, assembly or subassembly for economic ease of assembly using the lowest number of parts that delivers the full function of the product to the satisfaction of its end user.

DFM is about the design of an individual part for optimal economy and simplicity: it is the design of a component for economic ease of manufacture with the lowest number of process steps that produces a high-quality viable component that can be assembled as intended.

Thus, DFA activities precede DFM activities to ensure only the minimum number of parts are used and thus need to be manufactured. DFM is performed AFTER DFA to identify suitable materials and manufacturing process(es) that will support the intended design (of the minimum number of parts) that was established through DFA activity.

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