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Mukhtar Assiri

Wind Load capacity

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Hi

I have a sliding gate with a size 16m W X 4.10m H. The outer frame of the gate is with 10x15 steel tubes with 6mm thickness, while the inner vertical tubes are 10x5 3mm thick. The gate is covered with 2mm thick steel sheet on both sides. The gate is equipped with electromechanical operator. I need to calculate the wind load capacity. Can anybody help in calculation?

Thank you.

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It would help if you posted a picture of the situation with dimensions, wind load direction, etc.

DrD

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12 hours ago, DrD said:

It would help if you posted a picture of the situation with dimensions, wind load direction, etc.

DrD

Thank you very much for your reply.

Sliding gate Width: 16m and Height: 4.10m.

Outer frame: 10x15 6mm

Vertical frame: 10x5 3mm

Steel sheet both sides: 2mm thick

I cannot share the picture because the door yet to fix. But its on open area, the main gate of the warehouse where trailers will pass to deliver material.

Kindly let me know if you need further information.

Respectfully

Mukhtar

 

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When I suggested a picture, I was referring to a drawing, not a photograph.

DrD

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I'd use Fd (force of drag)  = 1/2 x Cd (coefficient of drag) x rho (air density corrected for humidity...in the UK we use 1.226 in the Eurocode National Annex) x area in m^2 (worst case) x windspeed in ms^-1 (max) squared...due to ground effects it should be okay to use Cd as 1.1...that said surrounding area causing funnelling effects (and thus increasing local windspeed) which could be an issue.

It will spit out a force in Newtons - it can be reduced to a force per unit area by dividing by the area....but the equation above gives the figures for your moment and loading calculations.

For your windspeed, you need to find the maximum likely in the area. DO NOT just take the figure, it needs to have a statistical likelihood of occurrance  50 years for safety....in the UK generally it is 100mph (45.15 ms^-1), but in the North of Scotland, or offshore, it works out at about 135 (60.35ms^1), but it does vary quite significantly - altitude has a huge effect too! To give a comparison , the "basic winsdspeed" of 22.5ms^-1 spits out ~43ms^-1....the statistical analysis can double the effects!

 

I can't do any more on this as the geographical and environmental factors are unknown....good luck!

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