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  1. 2 points
    DrD

    Rocket Homework Problem

    Mechanics Corner A Journal of Applied Mechanics and Mathematics by DrD, #38 Machinery Dynamics Research, 2017 Rocket Homework Problem Introduction Most engineers find problems involving rockets to be exciting. There is something about a rocket that fires our imagination, whether we think of going to the moon or one of the planets, or simply of shooting down an incoming missile. The subject of this post involves a rocket on a mobile launcher. The rocket is intended to be transported in a horizontal position, but it must be elevated in order to be fired. Both positions are shown in the accompanying figure. Read the attached PDF for more on this problem. RocketHWProblem.pdf Addendum: One reader has posted a proposed solution for this problem as a comment. It was not my intent that solutions be posted in the comments at all. I only want solutions sent to me by the personal message system. DO NOT POST YOUR SOLUTION IN THE COMMENTS!! Regarding the solution that has been posted, let me say the following: 1. Some of the answers are correct, while others are not. Do not be misled into following this solution because there are errors therein. 2. Even where the results are correct, there are a number of methods that I would not recommend using. Thus again, I say to all other readers, do not follow this solution, but work it out for yourself. 3. Be sure to document your solution, so that if someone else were to ask how you obtained a particular result, you would be able to explain it in a clear and reasonable manner.
  2. 2 points
    1. pressure represent intensity of external forces acting at a point. but stress represent intensity of internal resisting forces develop at a point.2. pressure is always acts normal to the surface. but but stress may also act either normal or parallel to the surface.3. magnitude of pressure at a point in all direction remain same. but magnitude of stress at a point in all the direction are unequal.4. pressure can be measure by using measuring device.like pressure gauge. but stress can't be measure directly by using any device.
  3. 1 point
    DrD

    ODE Solution --- Fail!!

    Mechanics Corner A Journal of Applied Mechanics and Mathematics by DrD, # 31 Machinery Dynamics Research, 2016 ODE Solution --- Fail!! Introduction Digital computation has become a major tool for engineers, and it is a great benefit. It can also lead to many pitfalls for the unwary. This note is about the latter, a potential pitfall that many engineers risk on a daily basis, most of them with little awareness of the danger. Early in the development of digital computation, every problem required that the user write a program specific to the problem at hand. If speed was a very important issue, the programs were written in machine language, so that they would execute as fast as possible. If speed was a little less critical, programs were written in so-called "high level languages." This included FORTRAN, BASIC, ALGOL, C, C++, and a host of other such names. But even with a high level language, there was the problem of generating a program for the solution of the specific problem at hand. As things have continued to evolve, it was soon evident that a lot of the work in writing each program was the same from one problem to the next. The major mathematical operations, such things as numerical integration, matrix operations and the solution of systems of linear equations, plotting, and many other steps were re-usable from one problem to the next. It was natural that this would eventually lead to the development of general purpose programs, able to solve broad classes of problems. This group includes programs like Mathematica, Maple, MatLab, SciLab, Maxima, TKSolver, and numerous others. Most of those just mentioned have built-in capability to solve ordinary differential equations, in some cases by analytical means, and in practically all cases, by numerical means. This has taken the sting out of working with differential equations from many engineering problems, and we must all be grateful for that. At the same time, we must also be somewhat skeptical about any general purpose solver when applied to a particular problem. How do we know that the solution generated is correct? How do we even know if it is reasonable? Most of the time, when engineers resort to numerical solutions, it is because there is no readily available analytical solution. Thus, when faced with a problem that cannot be solved in closed form, how can we know when to trust the numerical solution? This is a very serious question, one that all must consider. It you blindly trust a numerical solution, the old excuse, "The computer said it was OK" will not get you very far. The computer cannot be fined, fired, or (in extreme cases) possibly sent to prison, but all of these things can happen to an engineer! So, what can the engineer do when the differential equation has no known solution? Well, there are several options. (1) He can resort to any physical principles that apply to the situation. For example, if the system is such that energy should be conserved, then he can add code to calculate the total system energy at every instant. Just verifying that energy is conserved does not "prove" that the solution is correct, but if energy is not conserved when it should be, you can be sure there is an error in the solution. (2) He can try various approximations that may apply to see if they are in reasonable agreement with the computed solution. (3) He can verify the solution code by applying it to a similar problem for which there is a known solution. It is this last approach that I want to talk about in this post. ODE_Soln_Fail.pdf
  4. 1 point
    List of Seminar topics for Mechanical Engineers Hello 2 all engineers and Engineering students Every one look for good seminar topics lets make collection of good topics.. and latest intresting topics... Use Reply to add the topics u know.. keep updating it
  5. 1 point
    That was my best guess. Sometimes offering a solution to an ambiguous question, gets the questioner to realize how ambiguous the question is, and they can better form the question.
  6. 1 point
    Henry Kurniadi

    internal combustion engines

    Ignition delay, the time from when the fuel injection starts to the onset of combustion.
  7. 1 point
    Selection of material is an important aspect for manufacturing industries . The quality of product is highly depends upon its material properties. These properties are used to distinguish materials from each other. For Example: A harder material is used to make tools.A ductile material is used to draw wires. So the knowledge of mechanical properties of material is desirable for any mechanical student or for any person belongs to mechanical industries. This post brings top 18 mechanical properties. Mechanical properties of material: There are mainly two types of materials. First one is metal and other one is non metals. Metals are classified into two types : Ferrous metals and Non-ferrous metals. Ferrous metals mainly consist iron with comparatively small addition of other materials. It includes iron and its alloy such as cast iron, steel, HSS etc. Ferrous metals are widely used in mechanical industries for its various advantages. Nonferrous metals contain little or no iron. It includes aluminum, magnesium, copper, zinc etc. Most Mechanical properties are associated with metals. These are #1. Strength: The ability of material to withstand load without failure is known as strength. If a material can bear more load, it means it has more strength. Strength of any material mainly depends on type of loading and deformation before fracture. According to loading types, strength can be classified into three types. a. Tensile strength: b. Compressive strength: 3. Shear strength: According to the deformation before fracture, strength can be classified into three types. a. Elastic strength: b. Yield strength: c. Ultimate strength: #2. Homogeneity: If a material has same properties throughout its geometry, known as homogeneous material and the property is known as homogeneity. It is an ideal situation but practically no material is homogeneous. #3. Isotropy: A material which has same elastic properties along its all loading direction known as isotropic material. #4. Anisotropy: A material which exhibits different elastic properties in different loading direction known as an-isotropic material. #5. Elasticity: If a material regain its original dimension after removal of load, it is known as elastic material and the property by virtue of which it regains its original shape is known as elasticity. Every material possess some elasticity. It is measure as the ratio of stress to strain under elastic limit. #6. Plasticity: The ability of material to undergo some degree of permanent deformation without failure after removal of load is known as plasticity. This property is used for shaping material by metal working. It is mainly depends on temperature and elastic strength of material. #7. Ductility: Ductility is a property by virtue of which metal can be drawn into wires. It can also define as a property which permits permanent deformation before fracture under tensile loading. The amount of permanent deformation (measure in percentage elongation) decides either the material is ductile or not. Percentage elongation = (Final Gauge Length – Original Gauge Length )*100/ Original Gauge Length If the percentage elongation is greater than 5% in a gauge length 50 mm, the material is ductile and if it less than 5% it is not. #8. Brittleness: Brittleness is a property by virtue of which, a material will fail under loading without significant change in dimension. Glass and cast iron are well known brittle materials. #9. Stiffness: The ability of material to resist elastic deformation or deflection during loading, known as stiffness. A material which offers small change in dimension during loading is more stiffer. For example steel is stiffer than aluminum. #10. Hardness: The property of a material to resist penetration is known as hardness. It is an ability to resist scratching, abrasion or cutting. It is also define as an ability to resist fracture under point loading. #11. Toughness: Toughness is defined as an ability to withstand with plastic or elastic deformation without failure. It is defined as the amount of energy absorbed before actual fracture. #12. Malleability: A property by virtue of which a metal can flatten into thin sheets, known as malleability. It is also define as a property which permits plastic deformation under compression loading. #13. Machinability: A property by virtue of which a material can be cut easily. #14. Damping: The ability of metal to dissipate the energy of vibration or cyclic stress is called damping. Cast iron has good damping property, that’s why most of machines body made by cast iron. #15. Creep: The slow and progressive change in dimension of a material under influence of its safe working stress for long time is known as creep. Creep is mainly depend on time and temperature. The maximum amount of stress under which a material withstand during infinite time is known as creep strength. #16. Resilience: The amount of energy absorb under elastic limit during loading is called resilience. The maximum amount of the energy absorb under elastic limit is called proof resilience. #17. Fatigue Strength: The failure of a work piece under cyclic load or repeated load below its ultimate limit is known as fatigue. The maximum amount of cyclic load which a work piece can bear for infinite number of cycle is called fatigue strength. Fatigue strength is also depend on work piece shape, geometry, surface finish etc. #18. Embrittlement: The loss of ductility of a metal caused by physical or chemical changes, which make it brittle, is called embrittlement.
  8. 1 point
    DrD

    GEAR SELECTION

    I'd be inclined to start by trying to select appropriate tooth numbers for the gear pair. Do you want exactly 5:1, or simply something approximating that ratio? This is significant because of the wear problems associated with gear pairs that have a common factor in both tooth numbers. Moving past the tooth number matter, I'd look at the speed, lubrication, and power to be transmitted. Select a face width that will keep the tooth stresses low enough to give infinite life (unless this is a short term application), and consider the heat generated. DrD
  9. 1 point
    Yup ,,, Pressure can causes stress but stress can't ....
  10. 1 point
    Sirazz92 has given a fairly good answer. Pressure usually refers to a distributed external load applied to a body. Stress is the distributed internal loading associated with displacement under load. DrD
  11. 1 point
    Moni K S

    Difference between Pipes and Tubes?

    In simpler terms, pipe cannot be bent. It can only be connected with elbow/couplers to change the orientation. But tubes can be bent in 3 dimensional form.
  12. 1 point
    Habib Hussain

    Difference between Pipes and Tubes?

    Tubes are used for both HEAT&MASS Transfer. Pipes are used for only MASS Transfer.
  13. 1 point
    Alaa Ghazalah

    Difference between Pipes and Tubes?

    All pipes are tubes. However not all tubes are pipes!
  14. 1 point
    Qara Qarayev

    Difference between Pipes and Tubes?

    Different between tube and pipe : Tube:- 1. Tubes are more expensive than pipe due to tighter manufacturing tolerances. 2. Tubes can round, square and rectangular. 3. It is measured by outside diameter and wall thickness. 4. It is generally used for structural purpose, the OD is important and exact number. 5. Tubes are most stronger than pipes. Pipe: - 1. Pipes are always round in shape. 2. Pipe is measured by inside diameter. 3. Pipes are categorized as tubular vessels used in pipeline and piping system. 4. Pipe are typically available in large sizes then tubes...
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point

    Version 1.1.0

    13,777 downloads

    A COMPLETE INSTRUCTOR AND STUDENT SUPPLEMENT PACKAGE - Continued These ppts are set of instructor and student supplements. . A FOCUS ON DIAGNOSIS AND PROBLEM SOLVING The primary focus of these ppts is to satisfy the need for problem diagnosis. Time and again, the author has heard that technicians need more training in diagnostic procedures and skill development. To meet this need and to help illustrate how real problems are solved, diagnostic stories are included throughout. Each new topic covers the parts involved as well as their purpose, function, and operation, and how to test and diagnose each system.
  17. 1 point
    ghanbariafshin

    Difference between Pipes and Tubes?

    A pipe is measured by Nominal Pipe Size (NPS) per Inch and Schedule number ( Thickness of pipe ) and tube is measures by Outside Diameter (OD) and BWG number ( Thickness of Tube) . The common Pipes size as ANSI are produced from size 1/8" to 48". Pipes are used for mass. fluid and gas transfer in different industrial. Tubes are manufactured from size 1/32" to 12". Tubes are used for heat transfer in Heat exchanges,boilers,vessels and also in fire burners ( size 2" and more) and as instruments tubes and also accessories tools in Turbines and Compressors.