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Showing content with the highest reputation since 10/20/2021 in all areas

  1. GB Reid has given some very good advice. The question that remains is simply, is it worth doing? Will the modified support be stiff enough, or should you simply scrap that which you have and start again. I'd advise looking seriously at that question before investing much more time/money in this support. DrD
    1 point
  2. Friction Stir Welding Manufacturing companies dealing with high stress and pressure [aerospace], typically avoid welds, because of the weakness it creates in the metal and its limitations. But mastering friction stir welding could result to a much stronger bonds than traditional welds. As you can join large, thin sheets of metal [ex. Light-weight alloys], and shave off pounds of weight by avoiding the use of rivets, fasteners, and other support structures. Making the manufactured device /machine, lighter and stronger.
    1 point
  3. The Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR or Industry 4.0) is the ongoing automation of traditional manufacturing and industrial practices, using modern smart technology. Large-scale machine-to-machine communication (M2M) and the internet of things (IoT) are integrated for increased automation, improved communication and self-monitoring, and production of smart machines that can analyze and diagnose issues without the need for human intervention. (e.g. 3 D printing deploying basic mechanical processes like metal powder spray done using smart automation.) Best of Mechanical to collaborate with latest of digital to produce Mecha-digital outcomes.
    1 point
  4. Manufacturing method for Composites - Pultrusion The process of Pultrusion is utilised for the manufacture of the components which have a constant cross-sectional shape ( beams, rods, tubes etc.),and continuous lengths. In Pultrusion process, thermosetting resins are first used to impregnate continuous fiberrovings or tows; then they are pulled through a steel die which then provides the required shape to the stock and also sets the ratio resin/fibre. After this, the stock is then passed through a curing die which is precision machined so that it can give the final shape to it. This die is also heated to start curing of the resin matrix. Then the stock is drawn through the dies with the help of a pulling device. This step also determines the production speed as well. Glass, Aramid fibres and carbon are primary reinforcements materials, usually added in concentrations of approximately ranging from 40 and 70 vol%. The matrix materials commonly used in this process are polyesters, vinyl esters, and epoxy resins. Diagram of the pultrusion process. Continuous roll of reinforced fibers/woven fiber mat Tension roller Resin impregnator Resin soaked fiber Die and heat source Pull mechanism Finished hardened fiber reinforced polymer
    1 point
  5. Smart tools are required for smart innovation, and use nano componen matereals for better production & better quality
    1 point
  6. There are dependencies at every level of manufacturing, consistent reliable construction materials being one of the most critical to positive results. There has been a disturbing trend of sub-standard steel deliveries world wide, vendors cutting corners on specified deliveries. In at least two cases structural components in completed buildings have been found sub-standard After the major structure was up, and steel delivered for component manufacturing is widely unreliable and out of standard. It is now necessary to keep an inspection crew testing deliveries, and in the case of large foreign shipments an inspection crew needs travel to inspect the steel Before shipment from marshaling yards.
    1 point
  7. First day at work in a new Company and my director says that our main customer requires us to implement a Production Part Approval Process (PPAP) for their particular product stream. My director says he doesn't particularly want, or have the time to be involved and can I just get on with the implementation? This happened to me and was as perfect a Company introduction process as it would be possible to have! Straight into meeting and discussions with relevant staff, introducing all the relevant quality and production control documentation, presenting the finished process to the customer and getting the initial sign off first time. After 40 years in manufacturing it's great to still be able to learn and make progress
    1 point
  8. As in forging there are two types o forging, hot forging and cold forging. The gear is manufactured by either way, each way has its pros and cons. I'll state about cold forging, it is a new method of gear manufacturing, not as new as state of the art but it is quite rarely used. by cold forging of gears there are various stresses generated as metal is not adequate to deformation. Thus it is point of advantage if you want to develop compressive stresses as to improve the fatigue life.
    1 point
  9. Product Development of production machinery is expensive and time consuming, building a machine and throwing it into production with minimal testing can be risky and rewarding at the same time. Once you have started to produce a consumer product and a customer demand, it can be detrimental to the business when your proprietary machinery breaks down at regular intervals or for long periods of time, causing unpredictability in your supply chain. It is good if possible to have multiple machines that produce the same product so that downtime is available for maintenance, repair, and upgrade without compromising the supply of product to your customer. Many times in my career, I have been asked to build a machine or device to accomplish a specific purpose. Before I start designing, I do a thorough investigation to see if there are any machines that accomplish the same or similar purpose. On many occasions I have made some minor modifications to an existing machine that was readily available to accomplish the objective of my project. By doing this I can harness the time that the manufacturer has invested in the development of that machine and avoid costly down time. In the recent past, I was tasked to design and produce some custom conveyors that need to be a size that was a few inches wider than anything available in the time frame that they were needed. I gave it my best effort and we produced hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of conveyors and put them into production. I based my design off of a conveyor that we had purchased and made enough changes in the construction methods to avoid any patent infringement. I missed one key element, the leg weldments of the existing conveyor is a substantial weldment that provides stability and keeps the frame of the conveyor square. I designed the legs for my conveyor out of bent sheet metal and minimal welding that bolt together to allow them to be disassembled for shipping. Unfortunately they do not have structural ability to keep the roller support frame of the conveyor square. We discovered that if the line of conveyors got bumped by a forklift, it was possible for the frames of the conveyors to be out of square enough to cause resistance in the rollers and cause a high load fault in the electrical drive. I was aware of the issue and designed a brace to add to the roller support frame, but was never given the time or the resources to add it to the many conveyors that had already been placed in production. I have since been informed that they have discontinued use of these conveyors and have replaced them. Lessons learned: Build a prototype and thoroughly test it before rushing into production. Shortcuts often cause more problems in the long run. The devil is in the details, some of the smallest issues that seem inconsequential can kill the whole project. The process of Product Development is expensive and takes time, just because you have the capability to build something doesn't mean that you should.
    1 point
  10. Crystallisation is the transformation of a solution into solid which in turn leads to the nucleation of supersaturated solution. During crystallization well-defined and uniform particle structures are formed.
    1 point
  11. Railways wagon manufacturing requires a high quality steel depending upon application such as for preventing rust iron cannot be used, so stainless steel is used. More research need to be done for rust proof material ,durable and cheaper.
    1 point
  12. Heat treatment is the process which improves physical (mechanical) Properties of the material.depending on the application different heat treatment processes are used. This process increases the product life which directly decreases maintenance cost and failure of the product
    1 point
  13. Check the club section https://mechanical-engg.com/clubs/28-fluid-mechanics/
    1 point
  14. This made me Smile! As I said in my post, I have discussed this and had the detail in the "Seapower" sketches expanded on in the past, so I understand where the diagram is coming from and the idea itself...it is a little "unclear" from the above but the concept IS the "Seapower" diagram, the umbrella, a potential drive facilitator for the bubbles.
    1 point
  15. pms engineers

    Bearings

    PMS Engineers is an established supplier of world class bearings and power transmission products. We are the first-choice channel partners for some of the world’s biggest bearing and lubricant manufacturers including Timken, NSK-RHP, NIKKI, Gamet Bearings and Motherson Sumitomo – Solid Carbide Cutting Tools. With a powerful distribution network and support team in place, we collaborate with clients round the clock to minimize downtime, reduce working costs and improve the overall quality of operations.
    1 point
  16. Hetal Patel

    Bearings

    Types of Bearings There are many specialized types of bearings. Here are a few you might see in your everyday life while making awesome stuff: · “Normal” Radial Ball Bearing – What someone would normally think of as a bearing, with two concentric metal circles separated by little metal balls. These simple bearings can be found in everything from skateboards to drills. · Pillow Block Bearing – These bearings are a radial load bearing encased in a housing that can be attached to a surface parallel to the axis of rotation. · Cam Follower Bearing – A radial load bearing with a threaded rod attached to it. Generally meant to ride on a cam to cause linear motion, these could have other interesting applications. · Ball Bushing (Linear) Bearing – This type of bearing is used extensively to allow for the smooth motion of 3D printer and CNC router heads. Their purpose, unlike the other bearings here, is to restrict radial motion, while allowing smooth linear motion. · Automotive Wheel Bearing – These are generally allowing for both radial and axial load to be overcome. · Thrust Bearings – These have many uses (especially automotive), but lazy susans and bar stools are what immediately come to mind as easy examples of their use. They could also be useful for anything else that needs to rotate smoothly, like a camera panning device.
    1 point
  17. Waseem, why did you come to NYC without a job in hand to come to? How will you live until you find a job? How will you maintain a professional status if the only job you can find is taxi cab driver, waiter, or similar? Your coming with no job in hand looks like a serious mistake to me. DrD
    1 point





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