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ndems

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  1. 15 October 2019 Dear DrD Thank you for responding to my query. Every so often I do come across some strange statements and phrases and “manual side” is one of them. If the boss is a non-mechanical engineer some of the stuff which comes my way I have to seek verification from mechanical engineering experts like you. In industry you come across non-engineers like accountants, sales people, loss control managers and so on and so forth who do not understand what engineering is. I am sure you have come across such people and incidents in your career. Regards ndems
  2. 14 October 2019 Dear DrD If a trainee or apprentice in mechanical engineering (manufacturing industry) starts work today and is helping in cleaning parts and helping in dismantling a machine under the supervision of a qualified mechanical engineer would you say the trainee is “hands on - manual side” or “not hands on - manual side”? Regards ndems
  3. 15 July 2019 Please can someone furnish me with a simple formula for working out the forces generated by the simple machine sketch attached. Some time back DrD referred me to page 382 of your book “Mechanics of Machines”. It is all Greek to me I am afraid. I want to keep it simple. If, say, a very simple machine with two rollers, a metre long each with a diameter of 6 inches (about 152 millimetres) with a drive pulley on one side and a spur gear on the bottom roller and only one spur gear on the other top roller meshing with the gear at the bottom roller. The simple machine is driven by a 3kW electric motor which runs at 3 000 to 10 000 revs per hour which is 50 revs/min to 150 revs/min. The two rollers are roughly 15 kilograms each. The top roller is spring loaded running on self-aligning bearings with take-up housings. The bottom roller is also running on self-aligning pillow block bearings. This simple machine is used to wring water from clothes. The rollers are made from mild steel, spurs gears are from steel as well. There is a double V-pulley. Drive and driven pulley are 1:3 respectively. The simple machine has no cams or levers. How much force does this machine generate at 50 revs/min and at 150 revs/min? I will develop the machine later. What formula do you use here? Sketch of simple machine is attached. Thank you in advance Simple Machine.pdf
  4. 16 July 2019 Please can someone help me in giving me a formula to wok out the force generated by a simple machine in the sketch attached. Lat time I asked DrD but he referred me to a page in one of his books but I did not understand much. I want to keep it simple. If, say, a very simple machine with two rollers, a metre long each with a diameter of 6 inches (about 152 millimetres) with a drive pulley on one side and a spur gear on the bottom roller and only one spur gear on the other top roller meshing with the gear at the bottom roller. The simple machine is driven by a 3kW electric motor which runs at 3 000 to 10 000 revs per hour which is 50 revs/min to 150 revs/min. The two rollers are roughly 15 kilograms each. The top roller is spring loaded running on self-aligning bearings with take-up housings. The bottom roller is also running on self-aligning pillow block bearings. This simple machine is used to wring water from clothes. The rollers are made from mild steel, spurs gears are from steel as well. There is a double V-pulley. Drive and driven pulley are 1:3 respectively. The simple machine has no cams or levers. How much force does this machine generate at 50 revs/min and at 150 revs/min? I will develop the machine later. What formula do you use here? Sketch of simple machine is attached. Thank you in advance Simple Machine.pdf
  5. 15 July 2019 Second post DrD In my earlier post I used the wrong word - I meant to say "wring water from clothes" not "rinse".
  6. 15 July 2019 Dear DrD In your career as a Professor in Mechanical Engineering you have worked out the force generated by various machines. Some time back I asked you and you referred me to page 382 of your book “Mechanics of Machines”. It is all Greek to me I am afraid. I want to keep it simple. If, say, a very simple machine with two rollers, a metre long each with a diameter of 6 inches (about 152 millimetres) with a drive pulley on one side and a spur gear on the bottom roller and only one spur gear on the other top roller meshing with the gear at the bottom roller. The simple machine is driven by a 3kW electric motor which runs at 3 000 to 10 000 revs per hour which is 50 revs/min to 150 revs/min. The two rollers are roughly 15 kilograms each. The top roller is spring loaded running on self-aligning bearings with take-up housings. The bottom roller is also running on self-aligning pillow block bearings. This simple machine is used to rinse water from clothes. The rollers are made from mild steel, spurs gears are from steel as well. There is a double V-pulley. Drive and driven pulley are 1:3 respectively. The simple machine has no cams or levers. How much force does this machine generate at 50 revs/min and at 150 revs/min? I will develop the machine later. What formula do you use here? Sketch of simple machine is attached. Thank you in advance Simple Machine.pdf
  7. Hi DrD I hope you are able to see the machine details in the attachment. If not I will send it in a different file format. Envelope - W+D Reel-fed Envelope Machine HELIOS 102 -.htm Envelope Making Machine - W and D.pdf
  8. Please can someone furnish me with the right formula for calculating the Force generated by running manufacturing machinery, in Newtons. This can be any machine like can making machine or envelope making machinery rotating at 350 revolution per minute with 3 kW electric motor.
  9. In Manufacturing industry there are people who fix the machinery and equipment that manufacture a variety of products like cardboard paper, food packing, tin manufacturing machines etc. These people who maintain these machines are called mechanical maintenance engineers. These machines run at very fast speeds (pace) and when they breakdown the mechanical maintenance engineers fix these machines (I am not talking of the breakdown in electrics). Can someone describe the environment as too fast paced for the mechanical maintenance engineer? Because a maintenance engineer only fixes machines when the machines are not running/broken down. Is it a sensible description or ridiculous description? Does the maintenance engineer have to be as fast as these machines to be able to do the job? Or you can think of it as fixing a racing car. The mechanic can only fix the sports car when it has broken down or when it is in the pitstop not when it is on the race track. Can someone tell the mechanic that the racing car environment is too fast-paced for the mechanic? Does it make sense? Like I said the mechanic can only fix the sports car when it is stationary. The reason why I am asking is because one maintenance engineer was told by his boss (an Electrician) that the work environment was too fast paced for him and I said this was not correct.
  10. Hello Forum What are your views on Solicitors or anyone in the legal fraternity assessing/adjudicating mechanical engineering disputes? Can engineering disputes be debated because the building blocks for engineering are Maths and Science where you have single universally right and wrong answers/meanings/solution? How can solicitors be expected to understand engineering they did not study or train in?
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