JAG Engineering LLC

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JAG Engineering LLC last won the day on June 21

JAG Engineering LLC had the most liked content!

About JAG Engineering LLC

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    Member

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    www.jagengrg.com
  • Facebook URL
    https://www.facebook.com/JAG-Engineering-LLC-592696604082686/?ref=hl
  • Linkedin URL
    https://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=AAIAAADCPGMB84uD-vtCZwSdU21I5TPkFMoUnOw&trk=nav_responsive_tab_profile_pic

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Wyoming
  • Present Company
    JAG Engineering, LLC
  • Designation / Job Title
    President
  • Highest Qualification
    MSME
  • Year of completition
    1989
  • Engineering Qualification
    BSME
  • Year of completition
    1977
  • Name of Institute
    Pratt Institute & U of Santa Clara

More Information

  • Project Undertaken
    http://www.jagengrg.com/structures.html

Recent Profile Visitors

1,993 profile views
  1. Motor Torque Calculations

    This may I used the attached pdf to design a manually driven work platform. Once you have the required torque you can size the motor. I see someone provided a link for robots. I suggest you read both. I find I get an understanding reading multiple sources vs just following the steps. drivetraindesign.pdf
  2. Very true, but the required thinking is just beginning to make my suggestion a working device.
  3. That was my best guess. Sometimes offering a solution to an ambiguous question, gets the questioner to realize how ambiguous the question is, and they can better form the question.
  4. If you cut an off-centered circular groove in the top of the flat disk, and have a pin with a diameter to fit the groove in the bottom of the vertical arm, that acts like a follower, the vertical arm should go back and forth. The direction is linear but the velocity and acceleration I am not sure of. Now that is the start. How all the parts are keep in the proper orientation to each other and guided to allow it to move freely is where the thinking comes in. Speed will also come into play. If the arms needs to move back and forth 10cm at high speed you will have other issues.
  5. Where Would You Publish It?

    Dr D., My career never demanded publishing while I was an employee. So your explanation of the process then and now is an eye opener. For the past 4 years since starting my company I have been posting case studies. Not ground breaking research but solutions to day to day issues that plague business of all types. Your question has me questioning if I am posting the information in the most effective sites. To address your question, where to publish, I would ask why you need to publish. My blanket answer would be the internet. Your answer to my question would address the where on the internet. If you are looking to attract clients requiring your specific technical skills and experience I would search for related forums on line. I am approaching your question as a new task I have never done before, not from past experience. My words represent my though process. I am open to suggestions in refining my approach. There are likely forums for the subject matter and forums for industries that use your skills and experience. The search will be time consuming but cost little. You will be giving away some work but usually the problems people have are similar but not identical to what is published. Being able to follow your published approach or findings does not necessarily mean others can correctly apply the theory to a similar situation. In that case a reader may contact you for professional help. You may be asked to do an analysis or review the work done by those who used your published material, and need an experienced set of eyes to ensure they applied the methods correctly. I for one would use you if an assignment came to me that required dynamic analysis. So the current forum on which we met has served the purpose - a potential client. I suggest forums that are much more focused than the current one. You have opened a line of thought that I need to explore for myself. I have "published" case studies and examples on Facebook, LinkedIn and this site but I may have to assess my own recommendations to determine if a more focused audience exists that I am missing. Joe
  6. Simple Machines

    There are some stinkers who blow the grading curve
  7. PROFESSIONAL MEMBERSHIPS IN MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ASSOCIATIONS

    Ditto the last sentence. A membership card is expensive with little return on its own. Being active in a local chapter is very valuable.
  8. The New Way or the Old Way?

    Dr D, I can't answer your question directly but I have an example of something I did recently. I was reviewing literature about rigging for lifting objects. An example had a two legged cable of different lengths. The unequal lengths were to compensate for a center of gravity not centered on the object being lifted. The example provided two trigonometric equations for determining the length of the short and long cables. Almost out of instinct I recreated it graphically vs. working through the trig to convince myself that the equations provided were correct. I think the approach one takes has to do with comfort level. You did not come upon the vector loop until post PhD. You would have had a lot more math experience than most at that point. If I were to venture into vector loop today, I would likely continue with a graphical approach as a sanity check. After many applications I may begin to develop a comfort level as I have with algebra. I often can tell an answer is wrong before I know why it is wrong. Math can be like a black box. When we add 2 + 2 we may not consciously think 2 objects + 2 objects as when teaching a child but I think something similar is going on in our mind. When I look at a complicated equation I have to take it on faith it is correct or work from first principles to verify it is correct. If I can't do that with confidence, or not at all, I will not use the equation unless it is published in multiple independent sources. With the trigonometric example above I could have worked through the trig, but the graphical method was faster and easier to trust. For a cable length the accuracy is not as critical as a cam dimension in an engine, so my example is not the best, but your question got me thinking. You and I have discussed differential equations. Having had little opportunity to use what was presented in class years ago; my confidence using them is low. I would have to use another approach or two to arrive at the answer. Fortunately none of the work I do requires using differential equations. And for the trigonometric equations in the example I mentioned, there was a glaring error I did not see at first. The author repeated the same equation for both lengths. The graphical vs. the equation results did not agree. I instinctively measured the other leg and got the correct answer. I then realized the problem. I have yet to work through the trig to get correct equation for the other leg. Joe
  9. THE FUTURE IS HERE

    I read somewhere that the Romans known for their great engineering feats used brute force to accomplish said feats. Human power was used when horses were available and domesticated. Even then there were worries about unemployment and labor unrest if the human labor was replaced (aka automation) with "high tech" methods. http://www.jagengrg.com/blog/-dump-trucks-vs-donkeys
  10. The True Value of Certification

    I think some believe having a certificate is a magic item to hang on the wall. Others spend more time thinking about the place to hang the plaque, and placement on the their web page, than the purpose. They look at ISO or other certifications as an necessary evil to impress clients. They miss my point. What I identify sounds so ho hum. But people don't realise how many problems they have due to the issues I point out. Deming's work indicated 94% of the problems are in the system given to the workers vs the workers. Up to date through procedures are boring, so dismissed by many. I instituted a process which was driven by nothing more than a checklist that eliminated nearly all out repeat problems and avoided others. The check list started at order entry (which was outside my department and a major source of problems) through design release. I wrote about this a while back.http://www.jagengrg.com/blog/check-lists-simple-quality-control-tool
  11. The True Value of Certification

    The link below is an article about the value of certification for manufacturers. It is a heavy sell for certification. In my opinion it misses the most basic benefit of certification, which is the path to getting certified. http://www.machinedesign.com/industrial-automation/why-do-manufacturing-certifications-matter?NL=MACD-001&Issue=MACD-001_20170523_MACD-001_398&sfvc4enews=42&cl=article_1_b&utm_rid=CPG05000005789847&utm_campaign=11223&utm_medium=email&elq2=ac7bbf3354354d12ba54569ff985ae31 When people ask me about ISO 9000, the simple explanation I give, “the process of certification requires you to write down your process and demonstrate that you follow the process.” The certification system does not dictate your process. The mere action of writing down and maintaining the written procedure is the real value. In one of my blogs “Dumbest Guy in the Room", written in two parts, http://www.jagengrg.com/blog, I touch on the value of the written word and the perils of oral communication. Writing it down allows everyone to see exactly what the author thinks is being done or should be done. Others can read the written word and identify ambiguous sections, missing information, or errors that can easily be overlooked using oral communication. When everyone is carrying the information in their head’s via oral direction I can guarantee there is more than one interpretation. I would venture to say you will have as many interpretations as you have people involved. When written procedures do exist but do not come under the scrutiny of a certification body, it is very common for procedures to become stale, be incomplete, rely on undocumented knowledge, and for steps in the process to be missed from time to time. The subject article closes with a realistic assessment of the value for certification. “Is having a certification the end-all-be-all of manufacturing? No. However….” You reach the "however" stage, not my hanging the certification on the wall, but the process for obtaining it.
  12. perpetual motion

    If it was only at a trade show, I would not give it much credence. If the first video is truly at a university you would think someone has seen the bits and pieces. I have seen small machines that were more like toys that could not handle a load of any kind. One inventor said he made one of these toy like machines that ran for hours then reversed itself. Other than an all out deception of hinden batteries these do look convincing. But this one was fare more powerful than any others I have seen.
  13. perpetual motion

    While at the U of Wyoming extension program I saw many who though they had a design for one. There are many YouTubes with claims of such. The magnet motors are the most convincing. Here is one. The conversations are not easy to follow. One video feeds into another at different demonstrations, at least it does least for me. If this motor can run as implied and there must be losses, is it that the magnet's forces are being consumed in some process and the life of the magnets is the real cost of "free energy". DrD any explanation?
  14. What is difference between stress and pressure?

    MayankBambal that diagram makes it very clear. It provides the answer and I must say I have never seen it or one like it before that states it so clearly. If you think of steel as a spring they all have about the same spring constant. Once you reach the yield limit the slope of the graph deviates. Different steels have different yield stress values. Since most structures are controlled by the allowable deflection, the respective yield points are never reached. Often people will think a strong steel will provide a different deflection. If you look at a beam equation they do not include a yield stress value. If you are allowed a deflection that would result in reaching or exceeded the yield of low carbon then going the the strong steel is a solution.
  15. double crank mechanism

    I never heard of it either. This claims to be it!