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So many major companies are working hard to develop autonomous vehicles. Using GPS, radar, and other sensors , self driving cars can navigate most paved roads. But I have not heard of anyone addressing the problem of snow. Can you think of a way for autonomous vehicles to find their way on snowy roads? Myself, sometimes I cannot see where the road is at all. Thank god for the posts on the shoulder

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What about researching ways that autonomous vehicles accurately identify small targets such as children and animals and  bicycles /  motorcycles. It looks like at the moment all autonomous vehicle manufacturers are having problems recognizing these targets, I am a member of an organisation which is questioning the ability of these vehicles as there already has been incidents around the world involving these targets.

 

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I agree, but I live in New York state, between Albany, and the Adirondack park.  It is common to get 6 inches of snow, and sometimes 2 feet. I cannot even see where the road is when I am driving. How can a robotic car see the lines if they are covered?

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Most of the latest sat nav systems now have mapping which identifys road positioning in relation to white lines, indeed one of my franchisees has a Volvo which is capable of autonomus driving and tells you if you are in the correct lane and if you are in danger of drifting out of your lane. It works in deep snow as it is built in Sweden and thay can get up to 6 months of snow

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On the subject of biomimicry, I haven't seen anyone try to replicate fish tails for marine propulsion. My idea was to use an array of fins, every other one moving in opposite sinusoidal motion. A cycle of compression, and suction. Since the fins would only move back and forth, seaweeds could not be wrapped around a propeller shaft. It would tolerate shallow water. The entire assembly could be actuated by a simple crankshaft with two cranks 180 degrees apart. I think the same principle would work for moving air, but I don't have time or money to build either

Edited by Timothy L Dennison
Autocorrect used the wrong word

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PLEASE not another 3D printing "project"! A friend of mine built the 3D printed "Cobra" pictured with former Pres. Obama. It's *NOT* a Cobra! I have another friend who owns 2 *real* Cobras and the guy 2 houses east of me has one in his garage. What makes a Cobra a Cobra is the power train, not the shape. The 3D printed "thing" has a Fiat chassis and power train. Local Motors, the place that's supposed to become 3D printed car headquarters, is only a few miles away. By all means be creative and think out of the box, but when you do, make something REAL! Make clean or fresh water cheap. Utilize soybean husks or peanut shells rather than throwing them away. Figure out how to get siloxane out of landfill gas and make burning it more practical. Design an organic Rankine cycle to utilize geothermal energy. Make it modular for easy deployment and repair. There are countless things to do that have real benefits to humanity. Of course, you won't get your picture with the president, but that's OK.

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