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Heat Exchanger Capacity

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There are several excellent texts on this subject. I always recommend Lindon Thomas' Heat Transfer because he's been a friend for many years. This is a large topic. To get a meaningful answer, you must further qualify your question. What type of heat exchanger? What do you expect it to do? What fluids? What temperatures? What flow rates? Heat exchangers are used for everything from natural gas to peanut butter.

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dudleybenton is correct, we need more details to answer your question. Heat exchanges are very nuanced, and there are dozens of variables that can alter your question. How about you list what fluids, liquids or gas, you're looking into, and what you're trying to do with them? Specifically we need their temperature, pressure if it's really high or low, and how much fluid you're trying to move. Also could you be more specific by Capacity? I'm not sure what you mean.  

 

If you'd like a crack at it, here's a you tube video that gives a good start to the subject: 

 

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Dear Sir,

Thanks for replying my question, sorry for not sharing detail question,  my Shell and Tube ( U Tube ) heat exchanger has 3  stage ( Pre cooler, Interstage Cooler and After Cooler ) it used to cool natural gas by using sea water as cooling medium ( it's a gas cooler system) the problem are those original technical document was no where to be found, the maintenance guys has so litte data , i was trying to compile all the data.

im 1.png

im 2.png

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The seawater probably flowed on the inside of the 90/10 Cu-Ni tubes at about 7 ft/sec (2 m/s), so multiply nD²π/4 to get volumetric flow then by density to get mass flow. You get surface area the same way. The overall heat transfer coefficient, U, is probably about 5 BTU/hr/ft²/ºF (25 W/m²/ºC). The delta-T is probably about 15ºF to 25ºF (8ºC to 14ºC). The specific heat of natural gas is about 0.5 BTU/lbm/ºF (2 kJ/kg/ºC). From that you can calculate the flow rate of natural gas and estimate the heat transfer capacity.

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